The new LinkedIn Interface

Complaining on social media

Today I disconnected from a friend. Or better: acquaintance because I would have shared my concern with a friend.

Currently, there is a steady stream of complainer posts on my LinkedIn feed. Some pronounce LinkedIn dead while others just need to vent.

Complainer posts generate lots of interaction. Just like bikini photos, political posts, and cute cats.

The purpose of this article is not to complain about complainers. That would be an oxymoron, right? Why complain when I am blessed with a healthy index finger capable of blocking tons of complainers at the speed of light?

I feel that what I am about to say applies to social media in general so that I will share my subjective, biased point of view.

Why complaining is counterproductive

Who’s your daddy?

The charm of LinkedIn and what makes it unique is that it is the only site that attracts an unmatched amount of C-Level people. While they are rarely interacting with posts, it gives you the chance to catch their eye, get introduced and buy the right (InMail) to bug them.

Or to stay in front of your existing clients.

This is the most important USP of LinkedIn.

All other users are important too. The sales people, the job hunters … But, you see, we are less important.

Look at LinkedIn as a honeypot. And at the C-Levels as honey.

If you are a full pot of honey, the bears and the ants will come. Not much need to seduce them. Especially the salespeople. They will come 😀

What is your reason to be on LinkedIn? I know one of mine is the idea that C-Level Executives interested either in our sales training or my emotional intelligence training and coaching offering might see me.

How interested will they be in people complaining about missing features irrelevant to them?

Do not fall victim to the assumption that because negative people are louder, it’s what people want to see. Most people do not appreciate negativity.

But, wait. Is that true? Why do complainer posts receive so much interaction and likes then?

Interaction with complainer posts

Complainer posts often get much more interaction than any post of someone who took a lot of time and effort to provide positive value to his readers.

Tons of likes and longer comments than on most posts. Complainers attract other complainers who are often eager to share their dissatisfaction. In epic length.

Here’s the thing. Complainers don’t come with their credit cards. Unless you get paid for interaction, it might not be the crowd you are looking for. But you risk being muted by potential buyers and positive connections.

Nobody ever got a deal because he whined so nice.

Complaining about LinkedIn

You hate the new LinkedIn

Ok, so you are unhappy with LinkedIn. Two possible scenarios:

  1. You are a paid member and dislike that functionality was removed/the price increased.Understandable. Nobody likes something taken from him.Unless you are very lucky or generate thousands of shares of your posts, it’s unlikely that your post or comments will be seen by someone in charge. But you risk annoying your network.
  2. You are a free member and dislike that you lost functionality. That makes you so mad that you cannot stop complaining.Walk to your power outlet and pull the plug. You need a two-week break from the internet. Use it to check your sense of entitlement.

LinkedIn is a public company. The screw to turn is the income screw. If enough people canceled their subscription or deleted their profiles, the change would be right around the corner.They follow their own agenda and not yours.

For a salesperson, the ability to talk to as many people as possible might be a crucial feature of LinkedIn. For the people he wants to talk to … maybe not.

If one user shares their dissatisfaction with the support, it would not make a difference. If all the people who comment on complainer posts would write to the support … BAM!

I rid myself of anyone engaging in bikini posts or other irrelevant posts. Complainers? You’re next. Words are powerful. They change our brain. I choose to not expose myself to unnecessary negative words.

Words are powerful. They change our brain. I choose to not expose myself to unnecessary negative words.

And you know why I will not post this on Pulse? If you read until here you know it.

Cheers to adding value!

Complaining about LinkedIn - An Opinion

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